Add a review of "An Atlas of Extinct Countries"
authorAlex Chan <alex@alexwlchan.net>
Sat, 19 Sep 2020 16:45:55 +0000 (17:45 +0100)
committerAlex Chan <alex@alexwlchan.net>
Sat, 19 Sep 2020 16:45:55 +0000 (17:45 +0100)
src/covers/an-atlas-of-extinct-countries.jpg [new file with mode: 0644]
src/reviews/2020/an-atlas-of-extinct-countries.md [new file with mode: 0644]

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+---
+book:
+  author: Gideon Defoe
+  cover_image: an-atlas-of-extinct-countries.jpg
+  publication_year: '2020'
+  title: An Atlas of Extinct Countries
+review:
+  date_read: 2020-09-19
+  format: hardback
+  rating: 4
+---
+
+Read on [the suggestion of Jonn Elledge](https://twitter.com/JonnElledge/status/1294943819625005056).
+
+Each of the 48 extinct countries gets a couple of pages: some fun illustrations of where it was, a fun intro, and then some history of how the country came to be and not to be.
+The history of countries could be dry, but there's plenty of wit and a nod to the problems of colonialism and empires.
+
+Not detailed enough to be a reference book, but there's a thorough bibliography and it would make an excellent jumping off point for more research or reading, if it's your thing.